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MOW Not About Money

Ellen is promoted into a male-dominate leadership position, but soon finds opposition among management and peers, causing her to fight back and ultimately change the culture for women in business.

Ellen, a timid corporate woman, gets promoted into management of a large corporation for her talent and hard work. Oblivious that the “good ol’ boy network” is at play, she is destined to fail. Her career is soon undermined by a network of peers and a regime of corporate male management who don't want her there.

Her job is deliberately made difficult, she is written up without cause, and is ridiculed in meetings. Other tactics are used to drive her out and make her job miserable, including moving equipment out of her office, locking her office door, and picking up her company car from her driveway with a tow truck.

A paper trail of scathing documentation is created against her in order to have her removed from her position. A supportive male management friend tries to help, but gets threatened by his superiors and can no longer risk being involved as Ellen’s confidant.

Ellen has a warm relationship with Matt, a recently divorced gentleman, who is tormented with guilt for leaving his wife. He also suffers from his limited attention to his children due to his relationship with Ellen. He struggles to keep a balance between them, but he must leave her in order to have peace in his life.

Co-worker Marcie overhears a closed-door conversation at the office and alerts Ellen that management wants to drive her out. When Ellen finds that her position is threatened, she finally decides it is time to fight back for the sake of principle, even if it means losing her job.

Ellen meets with a few lawyers, and finds a good attorney to represent her. However, when she wants to retire, he sends her a letter withdrawing from her case. She becomes frantic, but after some discussion, they are able to work out their differences and she agrees to keep working.

While Ellen is heartbroken over the loss of her relationship with Matt, she accepts that he needs to move on. In time she decides to try a singles’ “mixer” event and meets Steve. They become enamored with one another, and a new relationship ensues.

Depositions take place, and Ellen wins her case. She throws a Victory Party to thank those who supported her, and Steve attends adding to her pleasure. Her attorney mistakenly overpays her portion of the settlement, and cancels the check. Ellen explains that she never checked the amount before making the deposit, and proves that her case was not about money. In the months that followed, her case set the change in the Corporation’s culture for the advancement of women in business.

Written by:
Format:
TV Pilot
In the Vein Of:
Erin Brockovich
inspired by true events
Posted:
01/20/2020
Updated:
08/29/2020
Author Bio:
Pamela Green has been writing screenplays for many years, picking up an agent early on who marketed her first script until his passing in 2005. She worked with a script coach and later a literary agent to broaden her talents while taking numerous screenplay classes. She won her first screenplay contest as a semi-finalist in the American Gem Literary Festival and Write Brothers Contest in 2014, and after a few-year break, returned to screenwriting and won as quarterfinalist with Scriptapalooza in 2018.

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