Austin Film Festival Script Competition

Austin Fest Film

Contact

1801 Salina St.
Austin, TX 78702
512-478-4795 (voice)
512-478-6205 (fax)

Web:
Click here
Email:
screenplay@austinfilmfestival.com

Contact: Steven DeBose, Director of Script Competitions

Report Card

Overall: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Feedback: 3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars (3.6/5.0)
Signficance: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Report Cards: 84    
Have you entered?
Submit a Report card

Related Contests

Objective

The Ultimate Runway
Now in our 27th year, the Austin Film Festival has been catapulting writers into life-changing careers for over two decades. Whether your dream is to sign a contract, land an agent, learn from an industry icon, or take home the coveted Bronze Typewriter Award, it’s simple: you can’t win if you don’t enter.

Josephson Entertainment Screenwriting Fellowship
This opportunity will provide a one-on-one mentorship in Los Angeles for two fellows – one writer or writing team with a feature script and one writer or writing team with a teleplay pilot – selected from the Final Round of this year’s competition. Fellows will be chosen based on the writers and scripts that imbue the most promise for development. Show More

Deadline/Entry Fees

Expired. Previous Deadline: 06/01/2020

Notification: Notifications for all entrants will be sent by mid-September

Awards

Awards range from $1000-$5000 per winner. Winners also receive reimbursement of roundtrip airfare (up to $500, excluding frequent flyer miles); hotel reimbursement at the Film Festival (up to $500); and the AFF Bronze Typewriter Award.

***All entrants will receive complimentary Reader Comments, a brief overall summary of the readers' notes.***

Austin Fest Film

Contact

1801 Salina St.
Austin, TX 78702
512-478-4795 (voice)
512-478-6205 (fax)

Web:
Click here
Email:
screenplay@austinfilmfestival.com

Contact: Steven DeBose, Director of Script Competitions

Report Card

Overall: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Feedback: 3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars (3.6/5.0)
Signficance: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Report Cards: 84    
Have you entered?
Submit a Report card

Related Contests

Contest Comments

You must login to post a comment.

First-time user? Register now to receive FREE email contest updates, news, results, deadline reminders and more. Rest assured, information submitted here is held in strict confidence. MovieBytes never sells or in any way distributes email names or addresses. We promise!

Austin Film Festival Script Competition

Contact

1801 Salina St.
Austin, TX 78702
512-478-4795 (voice)
512-478-6205 (fax)

Web:
Click here
Email:
screenplay@austinfilmfestival.com

Contact: Steven DeBose, Director of Script Competitions

Report Card

Overall: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Feedback: 3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars (3.6/5.0)
Signficance: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Report Cards: 84    
Have you entered?
Submit a Report card

Related Contests

Contest News

Inside the 8th Annual Austin Film Festival, The Festival That Almost Wasn't, by Fran Harris

It's been coined the premiere writer's festival but the 2001 Austin Film Festival came dangerously close to being canceled according to Festival co-founder/director, Barbara Morgan. "We seriously thought about not doing the festival this year in light of the September 11 tragedy," Morgan told a ballroom of about 200 writers and filmmakers at Thursday's kickoff session. "But in the end we felt that our judgment was sound. We have to keep living."

Morgan, who's been in her role since the first AFF back in 1993, told the crowd that she and her team were concerned about attendance from both speakers and registrants, a legitimate worry considering the decline in air travel the country's experienced over the last 30 days. "And we did have some fall out. We have some conference favorites who simply didn't want to fly," said Morgan. As customary during this 30-minute "Welcome Ya'll" session, Morgan noted changes to the four-day screenwriting conference, including announcements of panelists, presenters and speakers who would not be making the trek to Austin.

When she mentioned that producer Polly Platt (Broadcast News, Bottle Rocket) would be among those taking a pass on AFF '01, a very loud and disappointing aaaahhh fell over the crowd. Platt epitomizes part of the charm of AFF and what attendees continually praise about the conference--the informal atmosphere and accessibility to stars, agents, producers, and directors.

Even without Platt in the mix, AFF boasts some of Hollywood's brightest talent including William Broyles (Planet of the Apes, Cast Away), Scott Rosenberg (upcoming Spiderman), and Randall Wallace (We Were Soldiers, The Man In The Iron Mask). These and other notables roam the corridors of the historic downtown Driskill Hotel and are always willing and eager to share secrets of the trade with any and every schmoe who calls himself a writer. Apparently there are a lot of those in the world, AFF had a record 5500+ entries for this year's feature film screenwriting competition. So, if you're planning your festival calendar for 2002, you might wanna put AFF on your To Do list, it is the place to be in October.

This festival is almost as delicious as the barbecue in these parts.Here are a couple of appetizers from the '01 menu.

Day One, Thursday, Oct. 11 Craft Session #1 with Anne Rapp (writer, Cookie's Fortune, Mr. T and the Women) In her laid back, humorous style, Anne talked about her projects and her process, often reminiscing about the good old days (last year) when she was still a Robert Altman protégé. She's now working for hire in Sydney Pollack's company. She talked about character, subplots, and story and allowed the audience to ask her whatever their little hearts desired, including whose idea it was to have Cookie (Cookie's Fortune) eat the suicide note (it was Altman's, Anne had it being thrown into the fireplace-boring). Anne is currently adapting a book about you guessed it, a small Texas town, and offered some baseline information that will give you an idea of her thoughts on screenwriting. "A movie is nothing but storytelling. You put people in a room, turn the light out and say, "Shut up for two hours, I'm going to tell you a story. It's storytelling with a little visual aid."

The Agent as Advocate Stephen Harrigan (HBO's The Last of His Tribe and Gayla Nethercott, 16-years as agent, last 12 with Broder Kurland Webb Uffner) According to nearly early agent at the Fest, most writers want to get an agent before they've written a decent script. This is a big no-no, fellow scribes. In this open forum an agent and her client talked openly about their relationship but more importantly, what you can do to (and not do) to secure representation. #1. Do not send an agent a script that hasn't had between 5 - 10 rewrites. Your mom may think it's a really good script but chances are no one else will. Don't get it written-get it rewritten. #2. Do learn proper screenwriting structure before you send your script to anyone. Some of you are reading this and thinking, "Oh, C'mon, Fran, nobody sends stuff to Hollywood in improper format." But you're wrong. They do. And they will continue to do so. Just make sure it's not you. Buy a book. Stop being so cheap. Buy screenwriting software, you can write it off. And stop sending out scripts that don't resemble screenplays, people are laughing at you…yes, they are. #3. Do not contact an agent and expect them to spend more than two minutes on the phone with you if they don't know you, it ain't gonna happen. In fact, you'll be lucky to get an agent on the phone without being the cousin of a major player anyway, so save the toll. #4. Don't send agents flowers, toys or other things generally reserved for first grade teachers, they are not impressed. And another thing. No perfume-laced envelopes, clip art on the queries or mentions of you being the next Susannah Grant even if you are. Just keep it simple…and honest. Nobody's gonna believe you're Robert DeNiro's half brother even if you are. #5. Accept the fact that getting an agent is tough and just keep writing…and rewriting. The general consensus here at the Fest is that good scripts ultimately find their way into the hands of someone who can and will change your career and yes, fortune.

Stay tuned for more adventures and general reflections from AFF '01.

Fran Harris is a national broadcaster, best-selling author, screenwriter and aspiring filmmaker who's producing her first short feature entitled Write Lies. She lives in Austin and can be reached at fharris320@aol.com. For more information on Fran, please visit www.franharris.com.



Updated: 10/19/2001

Austin Film Festival Script Competition

Contact

1801 Salina St.
Austin, TX 78702
512-478-4795 (voice)
512-478-6205 (fax)

Web:
Click here
Email:
screenplay@austinfilmfestival.com

Contact: Steven DeBose, Director of Script Competitions

Report Card

Overall: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.0/5.0)
Feedback: 3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars3.5 stars (3.6/5.0)
Signficance: 4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars4.5 stars (4.6/5.0)
Report Cards: 84    
Have you entered?
Submit a Report card

Related Contests

Submit Report Card

You must login to read or submit report cards.

First-time user? Register now to receive FREE email contest updates, news, results, deadline reminders and more. Rest assured, information submitted here is held in strict confidence. MovieBytes never sells or in any way distributes email names or addresses. We promise!