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Osceola

When treaties are broken and the Seminole chiefs are coerced into signing away their land, Osceola takes the lead in urging the Seminoles ad their black allies to fight for freedom and justice.

As a boy, Osceola and his family flee the terrible slaughter of his people at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, where General Andrew Jackson’s army breaks the power of the Creek tribe. Osceola, then called Billy Powell after his white father, flees with his grandmother to Florida, and becomes a Seminole. If the whites had kept the Moultrie Creek treaty, Osceola would have been content to raise his family with his wife Morning Dew and farm the poor soil of the reservation. But the whites go back on their word, coercing the chiefs into signing one more treaty that will force the Seminole to go to Oklahoma, as part of the enforcement of President Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act. Osceola is not a hereditary Chief, but he is influential and Indian Agent Wiley Thompson orders him to sign the latest treaty. He refuses and makes plans for war. Major Francis Dade is sent with two companies of soldiers to Fort King, but Micanopy, the hereditary chief, and his brother-in-law Jumper, attack Dade and kill most of his troops. Meanwhile, in the east, King Philip and his son Wild Cat attack the plantations along the coast, freeing slaves and forcing the owners to flee to St. Augustine. Osceola goes to Fort King and kills Indian Agent Wiley Thompson. The war is on. Osceola and his allies, Micanopy, Jumper and Alligator, win battle after battle. Free blacks such as Abraham, along with runaway slaves, join the revolt, until finally the U.S. Army sends General Thomas Jesup, an experienced officer and quartermaster, and the war heats up. Jesup is one who plans in detail. Soon the Seminoles must flee deep into the swamps as Jesup’s army and militia pursue them. Jesup finally captures Wild Cat’s family and sends a message by him to Osceola to meet Jesup under a white flag. Jesup sends General Hernandez to seize Osceola under a white flag and bring him to Fort Marion at Ft. Augustine, where Wild Cat and his father King Philip are also imprisoned. Wild Cat and twenty others manage to escape and fight General Zachary Taylor, who has succeeded Jesup. Because of the escape, Osceola and his family are sent to Ft. Moultrie In Charleston, South Carolina, where Osceola becomes sick and dies in January of 1838. Meanwhile the great western artist George Caplin has painted his portrait and Osceola’s fame has caught the attention and imagination of the world during his struggle to attain freedom and justice for his people. Although the rebellion fails, a remnant of the Seminole escape to the Florida Everglades, where they remain unconquered to this day. Although this is a feature, it can also be made into a series, which the author is working on. As a boy, Osceola and his family flee the terrible slaughter of his people at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, where General Andrew Jackson’s army breaks the power of the Creek tribe. Osceola, then called Billy Powell after his white father, flees with his grandmother to Florida, and becomes a Seminole. If the whites had kept the Moultrie Creek treaty, Osceola would have been content to raise his family with his wife Morning Dew and farm the poor soil of the reservation. But the whites go back on their word, coercing the chiefs into signing one more treaty that will force the Seminole to go to Oklahoma, as part of the enforcement of President Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act. Osceola is not a hereditary Chief, but he is influential and Indian Agent Wiley Thompson orders him to sign the latest treaty. He refuses and makes plans for war. Major Francis Dade is sent with two companies of soldiers to Fort King, but Micanopy, the hereditary chief, and his brother-in-law Jumper, attack Dade and kill most of his troops. Meanwhile, in the east, King Philip and his son Wild Cat attack the plantations along the coast, freeing slaves and forcing the owners to flee to St. Augustine. Osceola goes to Fort King and kills Indian Agent Wiley Thompson. The war is on. Osceola and his allies, Micanopy, Jumper and Alligator, win battle after battle. Free blacks such as Abraham, along with runaway slaves, join the revolt, until finally the U.S. Army sends General Thomas Jesup, an experienced officer and quartermaster, and the war heats up. Jesup is one who plans in detail. Soon the Seminoles must flee deep into the swamps as Jesup’s army and militia pursue them. Jesup finally captures Wild Cat’s family and sends a message by him to Osceola to meet Jesup under a white flag. Jesup sends General Hernandez to seize Osceola under a white flag and bring him to Fort Marion at Ft. Augustine, where Wild Cat and his father King Philip are also imprisoned. Wild Cat and twenty others manage to escape and fight General Zachary Taylor, who has succeeded Jesup. Because of the escape, Osceola and his family are sent to Ft. Moultrie In Charleston, South Carolina, where Osceola becomes sick and dies at age 33 in January of 1838. Meanwhile the great western artist George Caplin has painted his portrait and Osceola’s fame has caught the attention and imagination of the world during his struggle to attain freedom and justice for his people. Although the rebellion fails, a remnant of the Seminole escape to the Florida Everglades, where they remain unconquered to this day. Although this is a feature, it can also be made into a series, which the author is working on. As a boy, Osceola and his family flee the terrible slaughter of his people at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, where General Andrew Jackson’s army breaks the power of the Creek tribe. Osceola, then called Billy Powell after his white father, flees with his grandmother to Florida, and becomes a Seminole. If the whites had kept the Moultrie Creek treaty, Osceola would have been content to raise his family with his wife Morning Dew and farm the poor soil of the reservation. But the whites go back on their word, coercing the chiefs into signing one more treaty that will force the Seminole to go to Oklahoma, as part of the enforcement of President Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act. Osceola is not a hereditary Chief, but he is influential and Indian Agent Wiley Thompson orders him to sign the latest treaty. He refuses and makes plans for war. Major Francis Dade is sent with two companies of soldiers to Fort King, but Micanopy, the hereditary chief, and his brother-in-law Jumper, attack Dade and kill most of his troops. Meanwhile, in the east, King Philip and his son Wild Cat attack the plantations along the coast, freeing slaves and forcing the owners to flee to St. Augustine. Osceola goes to Fort King and kills Indian Agent Wiley Thompson. The war is on. Osceola and his allies, Micanopy, Jumper and Alligator, win battle after battle. Free blacks such as Abraham, along with runaway slaves, join the revolt, until finally the U.S. Army sends General Thomas Jesup, an experienced officer and quartermaster, and the war heats up. Jesup is one who plans in detail. Soon the Seminoles must flee deep into the swamps as Jesup’s army and militia pursue them. Jesup finally captures Wild Cat’s family and sends a message by him to Osceola to meet Jesup under a white flag. Jesup sends General Hernandez to seize Osceola under a white flag and bring him to Fort Marion at Ft. Augustine, where Wild Cat and his father King Philip are also imprisoned. Wild Cat and twenty others manage to escape and fight General Zachary Taylor, who has succeeded Jesup. Because of the escape, Osceola and his family are sent to Ft. Moultrie In Charleston, South Carolina, where Osceola becomes sick and dies in January of 1838. Meanwhile the great western artist George Caplin has painted his portrait and Osceola’s fame has caught the attention and imagination of the world during his struggle to attain freedom and justice for his people. Although the rebellion fails, a remnant of the Seminole escape to the Florida Everglades, where they remain unconquered to this day. Although this is a feature, it can also be made into a series, which the author is working on.

Script Excerpt
Written by:
Format:
TV Pilot
Budget:
Modest
Starring Roles For:
Adam Beach, Michael Spears, Rodney A. Grant
Floyd Westerman, Arlen Bitterbuck, Wes Studi
Kimberly Norris Guerrero
In the Vein Of:
Dances With Wolves
Into the West (series)
Last of the Mohicans
Posted:
01/12/2021
Updated:
01/26/2021
Author Bio:
Jerry Robbins is a screenwriter who has written a number of historical, contemporary, and sci-fi sceenplays.