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New York Screenplay Contest

New York Screenplay Contest

Contact

201 East Jefferson Street, Suite 318
Syracuse, NY 13202

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: Oscar Gemayel, Director

Report Card

Overall: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (3.9/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.1/5.0)
Signficance: 2.5 stars2.5 stars2.5 stars (2.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 12    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Objective

The New York Screenplay Contest is a global screenwriting contest designed to launch careers and provide recognition and network opportunities to the world's best new voices in screenwriting for film and television. The New York Screenplay Contest awards its winners with cash, prizes, sponsorship packages, and meetings with leading industry professionals.

Deadline/Entry Fees

Contact contest for this year's deadline.

WinningScripts Pro $10 Off Coupon

Rules

  • All scripts should be written in English and submitted electronically via our online entry form in one of the following formats: .PDF (preferred), Final Draft, Movie Magic Screenwriter, Microsoft Word, Rich Text Format, or Text.
  • You may submit your entry by mail. Use our electronic form to walk you through the process.
  • All mailed in entries must be mailed and postmarked by the applicable Entry Deadline.
  • Screenplay entries submitted by mail should be clearly marked with the Submission Tracking Number issued by our electronic entry system.
  • All Entry fees must be paid in U.S. dollars.
  • Entry in the competition is void where prohibited by law.
  • Judges and employees who work for the New York Screenplay Contest are not eligible to enter the competition, nor are their affiliates or immediate family members.
  • Screenplays written by up to five people may be entered in the contest. Only one entry fee is required for such entries. All writers' names should be listed on the online entry form. All writers must authorize submission of the entry. By submitting online to the New York Screenplay Contest, all writers authorize the submission. If a screenplay is written by multiple authors, all cash awards will be split equally between the writers. If a screenplay is written by multiple writers, prizes will be divided at the writers' discretion.
  • Entrants to the New York Screenplay Contest retain all rights to their screenplays.
  • The competition is not responsible for submissions that are lost, stolen, or damaged in transit, and we cannot return scripts once they have been submitted. Please retain an original copy of your screenplay.
  • Once a script has been entered into competition, we will not accept substitutions or revised drafts. If you wish to submit a revised draft of your script, you must enter it as a new submission.
  • The New York Screenplay Contest will not share your screenplay with anyone except the official judges of the competition.
  • By entering the New York Screenplay Contest, you represent that your entry is your original work, and does not infringe on the copyright or other rights of other people.
  • Entry fees are non-refundable.
  • Submissions must be the original work of the applicant. Entries may be adapted from the applicant's own work.
  • Decisions of the Judges are final and may not be disputed. The Judges will adhere to our screenwriting contest guidelines and standard judging criteria; however, the contest and its administrators may not be held responsible for any errors or omissions on the part of the Judges.
  • You agree to indemnify and hold us (including our employees, officers, shareholders, subsidiaries, affiliates, agents, co-branders or other partners) harmless from any claim or demand, including reasonable attorneys' fees, made by you or any third party due to or arising out of project(s) you submit, transmit or make available to our awards competition.
  • The New York Screenplay Contest reserves the right to make any necessary changes to deadlines, dates, rules, and scheduling.
  • By submitting a project to the New York Screenplay Contest, you agree that you have read, understood, and agree to all of the Rules and Conditions and that you are duly authorized to submit your project to competition.

Awards

This year's New York Screenplay Contest will see over $10,000 in cash and prizes presented to the Winners and Official Finalists of the competition!

The New York Screenplay Contest awards and recognizes only the most finely written screenplays with distinction in four exclusive award tiers.

The judges will select one Grand Prize Winner for each official competition category along with an overall Grand Jury Prize Winner selected as the very best project from among all the competition categories. This is the contest's highest and most distinguished honor.

2nd and 3rd place awards are also presented in each of the main competition categories, the Empire Award and the Park Avenue Award, respectively.

In addition, up to 10 Official Finalists will be selected in each of the main competition categories at the discretion of the judges.

Most importantly, we will promote your winning script with a targeted press release through our PR firm to Hollywood trade publications, the entertainment media, and our exclusive industry list of hundreds of production companies, producers, executives, and literary agents.

To preserve the prestige and exclusivity of the awards, only a maximum of 13 projects per competition category are honored with awards.

New York Screenplay Contest

Contact

201 East Jefferson Street, Suite 318
Syracuse, NY 13202

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: Oscar Gemayel, Director

Report Card

Overall: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (3.9/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.1/5.0)
Signficance: 2.5 stars2.5 stars2.5 stars (2.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 12    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Contest Comments

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New York Screenplay Contest

Contact

201 East Jefferson Street, Suite 318
Syracuse, NY 13202

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: Oscar Gemayel, Director

Report Card

Overall: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (3.9/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.1/5.0)
Signficance: 2.5 stars2.5 stars2.5 stars (2.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 12    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Contest News

New York Screenplay Contest Winners Named

Operation No Moore, by Michael Esser has been named the Grand Jury Prize Winner of the 2014 New York Screenplay Contest.

Updated: 09/22/2014

New York Screenplay Contest Announces Finalists

The New York Screenplay Contest has announced their finalists for 2014.

Updated: 09/19/2014

New York Screenplay Contest Announces Winners

Stephen Guest's The Other Side of Normal has been named the Grand Jury Prize Winner of the 2013 New York Screenplay Contest.

Updated: 09/26/2013

New York Screenplay Contest Announces Winners

Jake Lee Hanne's .270 has been named the winner of the 2012 New York Screenplay Contest.

Updated: 10/23/2012

New York Screenplay Contest

Contact

201 East Jefferson Street, Suite 318
Syracuse, NY 13202

Web: Click here
Email: Click here

Contact: Oscar Gemayel, Director

Report Card

Overall: 3 stars3 stars3 stars (3.0/5.0)
Professionalism: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (3.9/5.0)
Feedback: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars (4.1/5.0)
Signficance: 2.5 stars2.5 stars2.5 stars (2.3/5.0)
Report Cards: 12    
Have you entered?
Please submit a Report card.

Interviews

MovieBytes Interview:
Screenwriter Brian Streaty

An interview with screenwriter Brian Streaty regarding the New York Screenplay Writing Competition.

Q: What's the title of the script you entered in this contest, and what's it about?

A: 'The Other Side of the Grass' Written by Brian Streaty Feature Screenplay Genre: Drama/Thriller E-mail: brian_streaty@ymail.com Telephone: (202) 521-9312

Logline: A tough NY judge involved in an illegal DNA altering drug-related government conspiracy to protect her cancer-stricken daughter is framed for murder.

Synopsis: Eddie Leviathan, the rich, arrogant, amoral, politically connected nightclub owner, isn’t worried about the implications of this drug-related conspiracy. He claims his nightclub is simply a path to ‘guilty pleasures’.

Eddie introduces Mayor Fisk to a brilliant DNA researcher with no regard for human life. The Mayor is clearly interested in the potential power and financial possibilities of developing the new drug.

The police chief Robert Stone meets with Dr. Thompson, DNA Expert, medical doctor, to discuss the possibilities of developing a DNA-altering drug and the impact on the inhabitants in the town. Dr. Thompson researches the drug and determines the key components are non-human DNA and DMSO.

Eddie’s evil nature and his role in developing the drug are revealed. Peter Adonai a man with an ancient past collides head-on with Eddie. The police chief, Robert Stone, and Mary Cassidy, the tough-as-nails detective, confront Eddie and his female accomplice after they suspect the nightclub owner is responsible for the deaths of countless citizens in the town.

Judge Kelly Grace along with Eddie and Dr. Smirnoff stand trial for Murder in the First Degree. The prosecutor attorney and defense lawyer question Stone about the details of the murder. Stone claims Fisk knew Leviathan engaged in illegal activities, which provided the motive for Fisk’s death. Stone also testified Leviathan killed Kelly Grace’s parents in a car “accident” several decades prior. Kelly’s dad was a detective investigating illegal activities at Club Leviathan in the 1970’s.

Stone explains that Kelly’s ring was found in the dumpster behind the nightclub the night of Fisk’s murder. James Diamond, the prosecuting attorney, questions Kelly. She explains that she was trying to save Fisk’s life and also admitting to drinking that night.

Dr. William Thompson testifies Leviathan’s DNA was also on the knife, and he was using employees of the nightclub for testing. In addition, Leviathan’s DNA actually modifies and destroys human cells.

The supposed original intent of the DNA-altering drug was to cure genetic diseases. During her testimony, Smirnoff arrogantly proclaims, “the sacrifice of a few is worth the lives of millions.” The jury swiftly delivers its surprising verdict after the admission of ‘guilt’ by Dr. Smirnoff.

Peter and Eddie meet in church where they both reveal their ancient agendas. Stone and Mary return to Club Leviathan to take care of unfinished business. Joey Grace visits Kelly after she’s institutionalized. Kelly’s motives are revealed and we understand the sinister reasons behind her questionable actions based on her violent unpredictable past and future.

Q: What made you enter this particular contest? Have you entered any other contests with this script? If so, how did you do?

A: The New York Screenplay Writing Competition was highly recommended by the screenwriting industry experts at MovieBytes.com. Yes, I was a Quarterfinalist in the 2014 Scriptapalooza Screenplay Competition.

Q: Were you satisfied with the administration of the contest? Did they meet their deadlines? Did you receive all the awards that were promised?

A: Yes, I was satisfied with the New York Screenplay Writing Competition administration and staff. The deadlines were met and I received my 'Grand Prize Winner' award of $100 for my feature screenplay 'The Other Side of the Grass' (Thriller Category).

The 2014 New York Screenplay Contest Winners:

https://newyorkscreenplaycontest.com/2014-winners

Q: How long did it take you to write the script? Did you write an outline beforehand? How many drafts did you write?

A: It took me less than eight months to write the screenplay, without an outline, and there were five draft revisions.

Q: What kind of software did you use to write the script, if any? What other kinds of writing software do you use?

A: I only used 'Final Draft version 8' software to write my script.

Q: Do you write every day? How many hours per day?

A: No, I did initially, but it's best to take a few days "off" if you're developing creative ideas or re-writing entire scenes. On average, I write over two (2) hours per day and fourteen (14) hours per week.

Q: Do you ever get writer's block? If so, how do you deal with that?

A: I've never had writer's block. Seeing a film in the movie theater even if it's on totally different subject always sparks my creativity and screenwriting.

Q: What's your background? Have you written any other screenplays or television scripts?

A: I work full-time as an Advanced Medical Systems project manager at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. I love watching movies, collaborating, and the creative process of screenwriting and film-making. I've worked on the weekends as a 'Script Supervisor'.

Q: Do you live in Los Angeles? If not, do you have any plans to move there?

A: I currently live in Washington D.C. but my dream is to run a movie studio in Malibu called Movie Malibu Studios (MMS).

Q: What's next? Are you working on a new script?

A: I'm working on a new feature script entitled 'New Year's Day'.

Logline: Ex-Specs OPs soldier with political aspirations teams with CIA double agent and current US President to prevent WWIII.

Please help with development of my current "Winning Script", 'The Other Side of the Grass', this would make an excellent feature-film and/or TV show in any medium.

2014 New York Screenplay Contest "Winning Script"

Logline: Alcoholic Judge becomes hell-bent on bringing evil scientist to justice after her daughter becomes addicted to a DNA-altering drug.

Posted Saturday, November 15, 2014